A Bath Renovation for Under $1000

It’s been a few months since we wrapped up our first renovation project, and we’re happy to report that the house sold within a few weeks! Since then, we’ve been busy adjusting to life with a newborn, but that hasn’t stopped us from working on our own house between naps, feedings, and diaper changes.

The upstairs bathroom has always been one of our least favorite rooms in the house, with builder-grade beige tiles and cheap light fixtures, a particleboard vanity, and a drab paint job. We’ve considered hiring someone to update both of our bathrooms at the same time, while adding a third master (more on that later), but in a fit of DIY inspiration, we decided to do it ourselves.

The project is still underway, but we wanted to share our plans before the big reveal. We’ll include the final numbers in the next post, but here’s a peek at what we’re up to:

Budget Bath Update

 

Floored!

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Our first order of business after getting the keys to the house: Removing the gnarly carpet from every room. When we first looked at the house, the wood floors appeared to be in good shape, but we weren’t totally sure what was hiding beneath all of that carpet. So we held our breath (literally—there was some crazy dust happening) and got to rolling.

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That carpet may have been ugly, but we can thank it for protecting these floors for the last 50-odd years. Besides a few spots, the floors are in fantastic shape, and not having to refinish them will help us save a lot on this renovation.

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Anyone in the market for some “vintage” carpet? We’ve got quite a bit of it stored out in the shed. Let us know, we’ll make you a deal.

We’ve got a thing for old houses.

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Pop Quiz: What do Charleston, Boston, and Richmond have in common?

Answer: They’re all cities we have called home over the last few years. They’re also cities that are known for their history—and beautiful historic homes.

We’re Erica and Todd Curran, and we’ve always had a thing for old houses. When we started searching for our first home five years ago, age was a crucial factor—we wanted nothing built after 1950. And while the number of bedrooms and the size of the kitchen were important, we were equally won over by details like beadboard walls, soaring ceilings, exposed brick, and lived-in hardwood floors.

That’s our first house, at the top of this post, a nearly 100-year-old cottage near Hampton Park on the Charleston peninsula. We adored living there, but felt the call to move closer to home, and we’ve since bought a 1920s American foursquare in a streetcar suburb of Richmond, Virginia (pictured below, with us and our nieces on the porch). As we’re slowly making this house our own, we’ve decided to embark on a full renovation project on another neighborhood house a few blocks away.

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We’re just two normal 30-somethings, learning as we go. As we move forward with our labors of love, we’re planning to document the process to share with anyone who’s interested. Because we know we’re not the only ones out there who have a thing for old houses.